Is it OK for Young Athletes to Start Training?

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Screen Shot 2016-04-11 at 3.52.32 PM

With the launch of our new Triangle Sports Performance Summer Program, we want to talk about the benefits of sports training for young athletes.

So, the answer is OF COURSE!

Young children are encouraged to get out and participate in physical activity, especially in this technology driven generation where cell phones, video games and TV shows pull us inside and on the couch. Physical activity can easily be obtained through PE classes and through any kind of sport that they might play.

However, young athletes that are serious about their sport need a different kind of training as they continue to develop and grow in the developing young stages of their lives. The specific training is targeted around the developmental stages that the athletes are going through and aims to lessen/prevent injury during practice or a game.

Training usually consists of a combination of resistance training and strength training. Not only does strength training help promote bone and muscle growth, it also helps to maintain a healthy blood pressure, cholesterol level and weight. The last benefits may not be super beneficial for them now, but they will definitely be thankful for it when they get older.

The internal effects are just as important as the external. What are the external, you ask? Training can easily boost a young athletes confidence and self-esteem. Think of your child scoring that touchdown or goal during the soccer game and having a crowd cheer for them. Can you imagine the smile on their face as their team high fives them?

touchdown
touchdown

During our program at +BEYOND Fitness, our goal is to help our athletes reach their performance goals, gain a competitive edge and minimize their risk of injury. Our coaches have a passion for helping athletes to achieve their goals and love to see their students excel and get stronger and better. The classes start on May 2nd and last through July 22nd and will be on Mondays, Tuesdays and Thursdays at 6PM at BEYOND Fitness. During a special free trial, we have already seen fantastic results in our athletes and we can't wait to see what kind of results that the summer program will bring us!

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Screen Shot 2016-04-12 at 10.21.44 AM

Do you think your young athlete would be a good candidate for our program? Contact the TSP Program Developer and +BEYOND's Health and Fitness Director, Dustin Craver, at dustinc@triangletherapeutics.com

Want to take a look at our facility and see what +BEYOND Fitness is all about before you try it? Come on by for a tour from one of our Fitness Associates! We are open Monday thru Friday 5AM-10PM and Saturday &  Sunday 7AM-7PM.

Lastly, don't forget to like our Facebook pages so that you can receive exclusive updates! +BEYOND FitnessTriangle Sports PerformanceTriangle Therapeutics

Are You Drinking Enough Water?

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water_bottle1-300x300

With the holidays coming around, it's hard to eat healthy. One of the ways that you can take care of your body through the enormous amounts of carbs and sugar (and alcohol), is by drinking water.

So, how much should you drink?

Water is so important to incorporate into your daily lifestyle.In fact, the US Department of Agriculture recommends different amounts of water based on age, sex and health status. The specific recommendations are based on the amount of water lost on a daily basis through perspiration, respiration, urination and metabolism.

Up to 80 percent of your body weight is water. Muscle tissue is comprised of mostly water and protein. Your body also needs water to help digestion, to stay cool, repair or regenerate cells,keep blood pumping through your veins and to help flush toxins out of your body. Your body uses different amounts of water for these activities every day, and even more in hot, humid weather or during exercise. Lack of water can lead to dehydration, a condition that occurs when you don't have enough water in your body to carry out normal functions. Even mild dehydration can drain your energy and make you tired.

So, in closing, this means that you should be drinking at least half of your weight in ounces. For example, if you weigh 120 pounds, you should be drinking around 60 ounces of water daily! If you are not able to drink that much water, try starting out with drinking about 3-5 ounces per day. You can even add low-calorie flavoring to your water like Crystal Light or Mio Energy to make it a little more tasteful and exciting.

Happy Holidays!

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Tis the Season for Running!

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fall-running

Fall is a prime time in our area when running events start to happen almost every weekend. Have you been inspired lately to run in a 5K or 10K but are not much of a runner or haven't ran in a while? We have some awesome tips to get you started or to help get you back on the track!

1. Warm Up.

If you happen to be a faster runner with a goal pace significantly quicker than your training pace, do no more than 10 minutes of light jogging and finish 15 minutes before you start. Precede to follow your jog with stretching (see stretching suggestions below).

2. Start Slow.

Run the first two to three miles with 10-15 seconds per mile slower than your goal pace. This preserves precious glycogen stores for later in the race so you can finish strong.

3. Drink early, drink often.

Take a sports drink to the first aid station and every one after. Taking in carbohydrates and fluid early will help postpone or prevent serious dehydration or carbohydrate depletion later, so you'll be a lot more likely to maintain your pace.

4. Eat breakfast.

As you sleep, your brain was active and using the glycogen (stored carbohydrate) from your liver. Breakfast restocks those stores, so you will be less likely to run out of fuel. Aim for a few hundred calories, such as a bagel and banana or toast and a sports bar.

Stretchin

1. IT Band Stretch

Recovery Rules and 9 Post-Workout Foods

The difference between an elite-level athlete and an average one can often be tied to recovery. The best athletes know and understand that the physiological adaptations they want to get stronger, faster and fitter also come through recovery -- not from just the work itself. What you eat and drink post-workout plays a key role, but many athletes don’t pay enough attention it. Here are the rules of recovery and the top nine most recommended post-workout foods with easy tips and recipes on how to enjoy them.Performance studies measuring recovery conclude that rehydrating is most important, followed by replenishing depleted carbohydrate stores (glycogen) and getting enough amino acids from protein to stimulate muscle-protein synthesis. The recommended combination includes: 15 to 25 grams of quality protein with 0.5 to 0.75 grams of carbohydrate per pound of body weight post-exercise. The American College of Sports Medicine recommends carbohydrates within the first 30 minutes of stopping exercise to optimize the update of glucose and amino acids into muscles, but other research suggests that the body is primed for recovery for the first few hours after exercise.

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Screen Shot 2015-09-04 at 9.11.42 AM

Post-Workout Food #1: Beets |  This uncommon crimson produce pick provides unique compounds -- nitrates and betalains, which can help the body transfer oxygen to muscles more efficiently, aid muscle contraction, lower blood pressure and act as potent antioxidants. Studies show that beetroot juice as well as cooked beets can improve performance when eaten pre-exercise, but they also have post-exercise benefits too. How to enjoy: Beets are quite versatile and can be enjoyed baked, roasted, juiced, pickled or grated into your favorite dishes. Consider pairing earthy beets with goat cheese and arugula for a colorful salad, or enjoy them simply roasted with olive oil, salt and pepper. They’re also great blended into recovery smoothies.

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Screen Shot 2015-09-04 at 9.14.04 AM

Post-Workout Food #2: Eggs | Nutrient-packed eggs are considered a “perfect protein,” meaning that the protein found in eggs is of the highest biological value and serves as the gold standard against which all other proteins are measured. Since eggs provide all nine essential amino acids, eating a meal with eggs post-exercise can aid in repair of body tissues and in muscle-strength gains. Indeed, studies show that the protein in eggs promotes a significant increase in resistance muscle strength among athletes. One large egg provides 70 calories, six grams of high-quality protein, five grams of total fat and a wide variety of important vitamins and minerals, including iron, vitamin D, zinc and choline. How to enjoy: Whether over easy, scrambled, hardboiled or sunny side up, eggs are delicious regardless of the preparation. Partner with a high-quality carb like whole-grain bread or fresh berries, or combine them with a banana to create protein pancakes.

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Screen Shot 2015-09-04 at 9.15.24 AM

Post-Workout Food #3: Greek Yogurt | With a whopping 14 grams of protein and just 100 calories per six-ounce serving, plain Greek yogurt boasts an ideal protein-to-calorie ratio, which makes it a great post-workout treat. Greek yogurt is an easy, portable snack you can enjoy after working out or use to make great recovery drinks. Keep in mind that you’ll want to stay away from sugary “fruit on the bottom” varieties, as these are loaded with refined sugar and unnecessary calories. How to enjoy: Instead, it’s best to add natural sugar from fresh fruit for that optimal protein-to-carbohydrate combination that is so beneficial for exercise and muscle growth. If you want a change of pace from yogurt and berries, oats or Grape Nuts are great options.

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Screen Shot 2015-09-04 at 9.19.45 AM

Post-Workout Food #4: Watermelon | It’s no surprise that watermelon slices are at the end of most endurance events. The sweet fruit is 92 percent water, making it the perfect choice to help rehydrate. Two cups of watermelon have just 80 calories and is a good source of vitamin C, lycopene, potassium and vitamin A. What’s more, an amino acid in watermelon, L-citrulline, has been shown to help maintain healthy blood vessels, increase nitric oxide and improve blood flow. In a small study, athletes who consumed watermelon juice experienced up to 40 percent less muscle soreness 24 hours after exercise compared with athletes who didn’t consume watermelon juice. How to enjoy: It’s perfect on it’s own or blended into a smoothie. Just blend two cups of watermelon chunks, one tablespoon of honey, one tablespoon of mint leaves, six ounces of nonfat Greek yogurt and a dash of cinnamon. This smoothie provides approximately 28 grams of carbohydrates, 20 grams of protein, zero grams of fat and 190 calories.

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Screen Shot 2015-09-04 at 9.21.21 AM

Post-Workout Food #5: Salmon | Salmon is best known for being an excellent source of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids. Additionally, omega-3s have been shown to help improve glucose tolerance and promote lean body mass. While fat often gets a bad rap, good fats, like the ones found in salmon, play an essential role in hormone production (think testosterone and growth hormones) and can thus aid in muscle growth and strength gains. Further, the “good” fat found in lean protein can elevate your metabolic rate, which helps you to shed additional fat and build lean muscle mass. Its high protein content -- about 17 grams per three-ounce serving -- provides essential amino acids to help rebuild muscle tissue. How to enjoy: Salmon is delicious when served grilled over a colorful salad or broiled in the oven with lemon and thyme.

Post-Workout Food #6: Berries |Berries are rich in immune-boosting, disease-fighting antioxidants, which can help squash the oxidative stress the body endures after intense bouts of exercise. The antioxidants in berries help mitigate the high level of oxidative stress (which leads to further muscle-tissue damage) associated with exhaustive exercise. Fortunately, by increasing intake of antioxidant-rich foods like berries exercise-induced muscle damage and inflammation caused by free radicals is diminished. In addition to being rich in antioxidants, berries provide a substantial amount of carbohydrates, which helps replenish muscle glycogen stores. One cup of fresh berries provides around 20 grams of carbohydrates, making them a good place to start when you need to amp up the amount of carbs in your diet. How to enjoy: Berries are delicious when paired with a protein-rich snack like Greek yogurt, cottage cheese, string cheese or a handful of nuts. You can also incorporate them into a smoothie with a protein powder of your choice.

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Screen Shot 2015-09-04 at 9.28.22 AM

Post-Workout Food #7: Quinoa |This delicious ancient grain has more protein than most other grains (four grams per half-cup serving) and is rich in iron and fiber. It’s considered a complete protein, meaning it provides all of the nine essential amino acids the body needs to function properly. The benefit of consuming a complete protein post-exercise has been well documented, and studies show a link between protein-rich foods and increases in physical performance, training session recovery, lean body mass, muscle hypertrophy and strength. An additional perk of this trendy superfood? It’s also gluten-free. How to enjoy: Quinoa makes for a great hot breakfast cereal and is especially delicious when flavored with nutmeg or cinnamon and garnished with fresh fruit. This nutritious, muscle-enhancing food is also quite tasty in salads or paired with dried cranberries and slivered almonds.

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Screen Shot 2015-09-04 at 9.29.35 AM

Post-Workout Food #8: Turkey |The Thanksgiving star is often overlooked for the rest of the year, but it shouldn’t be if you’re an athlete. Turkey is an affordable source of high-quality protein to provide the essential amino acids your body needs to recovery after a workout. Protein requirements vary by sport and how long you’ve been training. But as a general rule, endurance athletes need about 1.2 to 1.4 grams per kilogram of body weight, and serious strength athletes need 1.6 to 1.7 grams of protein per kilogram of body weight. What’s more, for athletes trying to maintain a lower body weight, a higher-protein diet may help retain muscle mass while keeping body fat levels low. How to enjoy: Roll turkey slices in lettuce and enjoy in wraps with spicy mustard, or place turkey in a whole-wheat pita and garnish with avocado and tomato salsa. Turkey dinner? Whip up a batch of turkey meatballs and serve over whole-grain pasta.

Post-Workout Food #9: Peanut Butter |Peanut butter is a favorite among many all-star athletes. It’s a good source of plant-based protein and healthy good-for-you fats. Plus, it’s much more affordable than other nut butters. A tablespoon of peanut butter packs about 95 calories, four grams of heart-healthy monounsaturated fat and 3.5 grams of hunger-squashing protein. Peanut butter is loaded with vitamin E, magnesium and the necessary B vitamins needed to convert food into energy. In fact, vitamin E plays an essential role in helping to prevent free-radical damage after heavy workouts so you can recover more quickly. Whenever possible, opt for an all-natural brand of peanut butter with no added sugars or oils. How to enjoy: Try peanut butter sandwiches on a toasted whole-grain bagel or on top of waffles or pancakes. It also goes well with fruit like bananas, apples or pears, or add it to your recovery smoothies.

What do you guys think? Are you concerned about what you eat after you exercise? If so, what types of foods do you focus on? Are there any tips or tricks that you can share? Let us know in the comments below.

Gains, gains, gains!

Most guys spend their entire life going to gyms, following a diet, performing endless reps and sets, and NEVER gain more than a few pounds of muscle. Yes, you may become very healthy, but if you are like me, you also want to see results. Many men start to think "maybe my genes just aren't made for size." Let's change that mindset.

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620x413x11111opt.jpg.pagespeed.ic.19SbXx2n4R

Rule #1: To gain the weight and mass that you would like you have to eat and lift big. It may seem obvious but the first rul is that you have to eat more calories than you burn. If you are struggling to gain weight, it's usually that you just simply aren't eating enough. Make sure to take in the right amount of protein and carbs each day. Carbs are very important when trying to gain weight.

Rule #2: Double or triple your protein intake. A good rule I like to follow is you should take a gram of protein for each pound of your body weight. If there is a type of food you want to eat more of, your top choice should be something full of protein.

Rule #3: Simple - lift heavier weights! There is a time and place for high rep counts but when trying to gain mass, it is NOT the time. Why? Focusing on heavier weights increases your strength and you will slowly start using more weight for more reps. As your total work capacity increases (amount of weight used times the number of reps you perform), you will start to add more mass.

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snoring-zzz-793557

Rule #4: The most simple and enjoyable of all of the rules. Get a lot of sleep! Getting enough sleep helps your body grow and repair itself. Not getting enough sleep will keep your muscles from growing and you will feel sore longer. When you are getting enough sleep, your growth hormone levels will continue to increase. Your goal should be to prioritize your rest just as much as your meals and workout.

Following these rules and just simply putting in the work needed will help you put on the mass that you desire and get you one step closer to your fitness goals!

Stay strong my fitness friends! - Garrett